Articles by: Geisel Communications

Finding a New Approach to the Opioid Crisis – NewHampshire.com

Read article – A feature story about the 11th annual C. Everett Koop Addiction Medicine Symposium, which focused on the theme “Harm Reduction in an Opioid Era.” The article highlights conference speakers Louisa Chen, Geisel ’20, and Nasim Azizgolshani, Geisel ’20, who started a safe syringe program in Claremont, N.H., last year. Chen and Azizgolshani said that such programs can prevent the spread of diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis C, and connect drug users with critical services, including treatment. The article also quotes Charles Brackett, assistant professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how New Hampshire has the nation’s second-highest rate of fatal overdoses. (Similar coverage in the Valley News and the New Hampshire Union Leader.)

How a ‘Perfect Storm’ in New Hampshire Has Fueled an Opioid Crisis – Boston.com via The New York Times

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Lisa Marsch, director of the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health and professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about research she led examining why New Hampshire’s opioid problem is so dire. (Similar coverage in The Washington Post.)

Event Focuses on Gender-Based Abuse – Valley News

Read article – Quotes Lucia Joseph, Geisel ’20, who attended the sixth annual regional conference of Physicians for Human Rights, which focused on gender-based abuse. “It’s good that there are events like this conference,” says Joseph. “Sure, it’s hard to keep up with classwork and labs and still get sleep and exercise, but conferences like this are an excellent way to remember that there’s a life outside medical school, and to find out about how to take care of people.”

How a ‘Perfect Storm’ in New Hampshire Has Fueled an Opioid Crisis – The New York Times

Read article – Quotes Lisa Marsch, director of the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health and professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about research she led examining why New Hampshire’s opioid problem is so dire. “We have highly available, highly potent opioids in New Hampshire,” says Marsch. “And highly limited resources to reduce the risk.”

Diagnosing and Treating Fake News – In-Training

Read article – A column by John Damianos D ’16, MED ’20, in which he discusses how healthcare is also caught in the fake news phenomenon. “With the vast amount of misinformation available to patients … it is more important than ever before for medical students to learn how to critically examine the scientific literature on a topic and meticulously attempt to separate fact from fiction,” says Damianos.