Articles by: Geisel Communications

Rural Children Struggle to Access Hospital Services, Say Researchers – Medical Xpress via American Pediatric Society

Read article – Seneca Freyleue, a research programmer and analyst at The Dartmouth Institute, is quoted in an article about her research, which she will present at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ 2024 meeting, that found that children in rural areas were more than six times as likely to check into a hospital without pediatric services compared to children in urban areas. “Children with medical complexities living in rural areas are especially vulnerable when their nearest hospital closes,” Freyleue said. “Expanding access to pediatric hospital services can help children with multiple chronic conditions receive care regardless of where they live.”

When Do You Need to Start Getting a Mammogram? Here’s What New Recommendations Say. – AOL via Yahoo!

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Debra Monticciolo, a professor of radiology, in an article about her study into breast cancer screening. “Breast cancer is easier to treat if it’s found earlier; we’re able to spare women extra surgeries and chemotherapy. It’s just a better idea to shift to early detection, and that’s what screening does,” Monticciolo said.

High Seafood Diet Linked to Increased Exposure to ‘Forever Chemicals,’ Study Shows – Health

Read article – Celia Chen ’78, Guarini ’94, a research professor of biological sciences, and Megan Romano, an associate professor of epidemiology, are featured in an article about their study into the levels of forever chemicals found in seafood. “We hope that this brings attention to the fact that seafood consumption could be an important route of PFAS exposure for high seafood consumers,” Chen said. “We do hope that this study will spur others to look more closely at this issue in their states and regions.”

‘Forever Chemicals’ Found in Most Fruit and Vegetables – Consumer Affairs

Read article – Megan Romano, an associate professor of epidemiology, is quoted in an article about her study that found PFAS in seafood. “Our recommendation isn’t to not eat seafood—seafood is a great source of lean protein and omega fatty acids,” Romano said. “But it also is a potentially underestimated source of PFAS exposure in humans. Understanding this risk-benefit trade-off for seafood consumption is important for people making decisions about diet, especially for vulnerable populations such as pregnant people and children.”

Dartmouth Researchers Look to Meld Therapy Apps With Modern AI – NBC News

Read article – Nicholas Jacobson, an assistant professor of biomedical data science and psychiatry, is featured in an article about Therabot, a text-based AI app in development at Dartmouth designed to improve access to mental health care. “We had to develop something that really is trained in the broad repertoire that a real therapist would be, which is a lot of different content areas. Thinking about all of the common mental health problems that folks might manifest and be ready to treat those,” Jacobson said. “That is why it took so long. There are a lot of things people experience,” Jacobson said.

High Seafood Diets May Come With a Hefty Side of ‘Forever Chemicals’: Study – The Hill

Read article – Megan Romano, an associate professor of epidemiology, is featured in an article about her research into the exposure to forever chemicals in a high seafood diet. “Understanding this risk-benefit trade-off for seafood consumption is important for people making decisions about diet, especially for vulnerable populations such as pregnant people and children,” Romano said.

New Englanders, With Their Love of Seafood, May Be at Higher Risk for PFAS Exposure – CT Public Radio

Read article – Quotes Megan Romano, an associate professor of epidemiology, in a feature story about her study that found higher consumption of seafood is linked to a higher risk of PFAS exposure. “Basically, New Hampshire is a kind of case study that quantifies seafood consumption, particularly in a New England state, in order to estimate the potential risk of PFAS exposure that may come from very frequently consuming marine seafood,” said Romano. (Picked up by NHPR.)