In the News

HIV May Disrupt Brain’s Ability to Process Sound – Pharmacy Times

Read article – An article reporting that a study conducted by researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine and the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University found that HIV may affect the brain’s ability to process sound. Measuring brain waves using the frequency-following response (FFR) technique, the researchers determined that certain speech cues were disrupted in HIV-positive adults even though they performed normally on hearing tests.

HIV Can Affect the Brain’s Ability to Process Sounds, Finds Study – International Business Times

Read article – Quotes Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, in a feature story about a study he conducted with colleagues from the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University. The study found that patients with HIV suffer from an inability to effectively process sound. “Initially, we thought we’d find that HIV affects the ear, but what seems to be affected is the brain’s ability to process sound,” says Buckey. (Similar coverage in Technology Networks.)

Political Divide on Reopening Could Complicate NH’s Pandemic Response – NH Business Review

Read article – A feature story about a New Hampshire COVID-19 study conducted by researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine and the University of New Hampshire. The study found that Democrats and Republicans are reacting differently to the ongoing pandemic and economic reopening in New Hampshire—a divide that could make responding to the crisis more difficult. (Picked up by Manchester Ink Link.)

Taking a Trip to Visit Grandparents or Older Relatives? Tips to Reduce the Risk – NPR

Read article – An article discussing issues to consider when visiting grandparents and people older than 65 as communities reopen during the pandemic. The article mentions that people should pay attention to infection rates where they live and that detailed information about local areas is available in national trackers such as the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care.