In the News articles

Too Much Medical Care: Bad for You, Bad for Health Care Systems – STAT

Read article – An opinion piece by H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of economics and adjunct professor of business administration, where he discusses a recent study he conducted that found one group of Americans—the affluent—were at particularly high risk for being diagnosed with four cancers that are less likely to affect health: breast cancer, prostate cancer, thyroid cancer, and melanoma. “Don’t make the mistake of thinking the affluent are genuinely at higher risk for these cancers. They aren’t,” says Welch. “Their death rates from these cancers are similar to everybody else’s. Instead, they are at higher risk of being overdiagnosed because they are so thoroughly examined.”

Aging Population, Retiring Professionals Stress Health Care – U.S. News & World Report

Read article – Quotes Julie Bynum, associate professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, who challenged the notion that finite health care resources should drive how health care is delivered to baby boomers as more of them enter their twilight years. “We can scapegoat the population change, but we can also change the way we deliver health care,” says Bynum. “We should think about what we’re delivering and how much return there is for people getting care.”

With Cancer Diagnoses, Better-Off Americans May Get Too Much Attention – WBUR

Read article – Features an interview with H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of economics and adjunct professor of business administration; about a study he conducted with Elliott Fisher, director of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of medicine and of community and family medicine; that found wealthy Americans are more likely to be diagnosed with some types of cancer than poor people.

More Cancers Caught in Wealthy People – U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News

Read article – Quotes H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of economics and adjunct professor of business administration; and Elliott Fisher, director of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of medicine and of community and family medicine; about new research they conducted that found wealthy Americans are more likely to be diagnosed with some types of cancer than poor people.

Some Small Tumors in Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All – NPR

Read article – Quotes H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of economics and adjunct professor of business administration, about a new study that concluded a significant proportion of tumors detected through mammography are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. It appears that “screening disproportionately finds good cancers — cancers that may be better off not found,” says Welch, who was not involved in the study. “I think that we all need to realize that we’ve probably oversold the idea that looking for cancer early is the best way to avoid it.”

How Countries Around the World Try to Encourage Vaccination – CNN

Read article – Quotes Timothy Lahey, associate professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about new legislation in Germany that will make it mandatory for all kindergartens to notify the German health authority if parents haven’t submitted proof of vaccination counseling for their children.

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