In the News

COVID-19: New Guidance to Stem Mental Health Crisis in Frontline HCPs – Medscape

Read article – Quotes Marcus Shaker, associate professor of pediatrics, about a new study that offers fresh guidance to help stem the mental health toll of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinicians. Shaker notes that the paper was “a much appreciated, timely reminder of the importance of clinician wellness. … Without self-care, our ability to help our patients withers. This article provides a useful conceptual framework for individuals and organizations to provide the right care at the right time in these unprecedented times.” Shaker was not involved in the study.

The U.S. Won’t Join a Global Vaccine Effort. That Could Have Big Costs – Barron’s

Read article – Quotes Kendall Hoyt, assistant professor of medicine, in an article about the United States’ rejection of a World Health Organization-backed effort to pool resources behind at least nine vaccine candidates. “Here’s the case where what’s efficient and in our best interest is also fair,” Hoyt said. “An opportunity for collaboration and diplomacy and wielding soft power—it’s got everything any enlightened leader would want.”

Trump Admin Rejects Global Effort to Develop and Distribute Coronavirus Vaccine Because WHO Involved – Salon

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Kendall Hoyt, assistant professor of medicine, in an article about how the Trump administration announced that it will not participate in the Covid-19 Vaccines Global Access (Covax) Facility, in part because the World Health Organization is involved. (Similar coverage in Eco Watch, Democracy Now!, New Indian Express, Scroll.in, and Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.)

U.S. Says It Won’t Join WHO-Linked Effort to Develop, Distribute Coronavirus Vaccine – The Washington Post

Read article – Quotes Kendall Hoyt, assistant professor of medicine, in an article about how the Trump administration announced it will not participate in the Covid-19 Vaccines Global Access (Covax) Facility, in part because the World Health Organization is involved. Hoyt said the U.S. move against the global effort to develop, manufacture, and distribute a coronavirus vaccine was akin to opting out of an insurance policy. “Just from a simple risk-management perspective, this [Covax decision] is shortsighted,” Hoyt said. (Similar coverage in Ars Technica, Newsmax, and ANI News.)

New Hampshire Researcher Warns That Unemployment Spike Leading to Rise in Those Lacking Health Insurance – The Center Square

Read article – Quotes Elliott Fisher, professor of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how the number of uninsured people in New Hampshire could continue to rise as the COVID-19 pandemic persists. “As with everything else in the United States, when things go wrong, the people who suffer are low-income people and racial minorities because of centuries of systemic racism,” he said. “The burden of a loss of employment and loss of insurance is going to fall squarely on the poor.” (Picked up by Laconia Daily Sun and Conway Daily Sun.)

A Global COVID-19 Facility Could Prevent ‘Vaccine Nationalism’—But the Challenges Are Steep – Devex

Read article – Quotes Kendall Hoyt, assistant professor of medicine, in an article about COVID-19 vaccine development and how “vaccine nationalism” could leave the poorest countries behind. “Competition is sort of a time-honored way to generate innovation, but it might hinder efforts to develop a COVID vaccine and to make it equitably available,” said Hoyt.

Succeeding in Hybrid, Online Med School Classes – U.S. News & World Report

Read article – An article that shares tips with first-year medical students on how to adjust to distance learning. The article mentions that the Geisel School of Medicine plans to use a hybrid learning model for first-year med students this fall. Students will attend large group activities remotely, while some small group activities will take place in classrooms arranged to promote social distancing.