In the News

Junk Food Ads Disproportionately Target Black and Hispanic Kids: Report – Reuters

Read article – Quotes Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and of pediatrics, in an article about a new study that found that television advertising in the U.S. for candy, fast food, sugary drinks, and other unhealthy treats continues to target mostly black and Hispanic youth. “Unfortunately, the foods and drinks most heavily targeted to children of color are high in sugar, salt and/or fat like sugary drinks, candy, and fast food,” says Emond, who was not involved in the study. “And these foods should not be consumed on a regular basis.” (Picked up by The Gazette, Ary News, WTVB, and CompuServe News.)

What Does ‘Dead’ Mean? The Debate Continues Some 50 Years After Harvard Defined Death. – Forbes

Read article – Quotes James Bernat, the Louis and Ruth Frank Professor of Neuroscience and active emeritus professor of neurology and medicine, in an article about a new report that commemorates the concept of “brain death” and raises new and lasting questions about what it means to be dead as well as implications for organ transplantation.

Which Is Safe Enough: 1 ppm or 10 ppm? How Do We Know? – Granite Geek

Read article – Quotes Britton Goodale, research assistant in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and a member of Dartmouth’s Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, in an article about predictive toxicology, which tries to move beyond the time-consuming laboratory and field studies which have long been used to determine the toxicity of chemicals, making quicker decisions using more easily obtained information such as the molecular structure of substances.

Granite Geek: Is That Chemical Safe? Predictive Toxicology May Have the Answer – Concord Monitor

Read article – Quotes Britton Goodale, research assistant in the department of microbiology and immunology and a member of Dartmouth’s Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, in an article about predictive toxicology, which tries to move beyond the time-consuming laboratory and field studies which have long been used to determine the toxicity of chemicals, making quicker decisions using more easily obtained information such as the molecular structure of substances. “Just like machine learning is being used to predict what we might buy, predictive toxicology is an emerging field to generate data in the lab and compare it across chemical structures, using big data to better predict the toxic effects that a chemical might have,” says Goodale.

Spending on Consumer Drug Ads Skyrockets – Consumer Reports

Read article – Continued coverage of research coauthored by Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and the late Lisa Schwartz, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, that found that between 1997 and 2016, spending on consumer ads for any type of healthcare service, such as DNA tests and smoking cessation campaigns, rose to $10 billion from $2 billion. The largest share—nearly $6 billion—went for drug ads. (Similar coverage in New Hampshire Union LeaderHerald-Tribuneand MM&M.)

From Big Pharma to Your Living Room: Health Care Industry Spends $30B a Year Advertising Its Wares — From Drugs to Stem Cell Treatments – Get Healthy via Kaiser Health News

Read article – Continued coverage of research conducted by Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and Lisa Schwartz, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, that found that advertisers spent nearly $10 billion marketing prescription drugs and medical services to the American public in 2016—five times what they doled out 20 years earlier. (Similar coverage in Insurance Journal.)

Dartmouth Researchers Hail N.H. Bill to Cut Arsenic Allowed in Water – Valley News

Read article – Quotes Britton Goodale, research assistant in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and a member of Dartmouth’s Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, in a feature story about how she and additional Dartmouth researchers studying the effects of toxic metals are applauding a plan to reduce the allowable threshold for arsenic levels in New Hampshire’s drinking water. “Our research supports (the Department of Environmental Services) recommendation to reduce the limit,” says Goodale. “It would help protect the health of people drinking water in New Hampshire. (Similar coverage in MileSplit.)