In the News

There’s Arsenic and Lead in Many Brands of Fruit Juice. Should You Be Concerned? – NPR

Read article – Quotes Margaret Karagas, the James W. Squires Professor and chair of epidemiology, and professor of community and family medicine; and Carolyn Murray, assistant professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice; in an article about a new report conducted by the consumer-advocacy organization Consumer Reports that tested 45 fruit juices, including apple, grape and juice blends, and found that 21 of them had “concerning levels” of cadmium, arsenic, and/or lead.

Can AI Help Improve Medical Communications? – Market Business News

Read article – Quotes Glyn Elwyn, professor of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and of community and family medicine, in an article about the potential of AI to improve communications in healthcare settings. “Many clinicians’ communications skills aren’t formerly assessed—either during school or in early practice. At the same time, there is a lot of evidence that clinicians often struggle when communicating with their patients,” says Elwyn. “It’s hard to improve on something when you’re not being given any feedback and don’t know how you’re doing.”

FDA Discusses Using Drug Therapy to Help Teens Quit Vaping – The Fix

Read article – Quotes Susanne Tanski, associate professor of pediatrics, in an article about how the FDA recently held a public hearing to discuss the vaping epidemic among teens. “Clinicians urgently require new solutions to safely and effectively help stop [adolescents] using these and all tobacco products for good,” says Tanski. “There is unfortunately virtually no data on how to treat an adolescent with e-cigarette dependence.”

The FDA Is Considering Drugs to Help Kids Quit Vaping – The Philadelphia Tribune via CNN

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Susanne Tanski, associate professor of pediatrics, in an article about how the Food and Drug Administration is considering the role of drug therapies to get kids to quit vapes and other nicotine products, with medical organizations and vaping groups weighing in during a public hearing Friday on how to address rising levels of e-cigarette use among youth. (Picked up by WKTV.)

The FDA Is Considering Drugs to Help Kids Quit Vaping – CNN

Read article – Quotes Susanne Tanski, associate professor of pediatrics, in an article about how the Food and Drug Administration is considering the role of drug therapies to get kids to quit vapes and other nicotine products, with medical organizations and vaping groups weighing in during a public hearing Friday on how to address rising levels of e-cigarette use among youth. “These products deliver very high levels of nicotine, meaning that even brief experimentation is likely to put adolescents at risk for long-term dependence,” Tanski, former chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Tobacco Consortium, told the FDA. (Picked up by WHNT, WSLS, WREG, KTLA, and many more.)

WHO Names Anti-Vax Top Health Threat: Hysteresis May Describe Movement – Clinical Advisor

Read article – An article about how the World Health Organization (WHO) named vaccine hesitancy one of the top 10 threats to global health in 2019 and quotes Feng Fu, assistant professor of mathematics and adjunct assistant professor of biomedical data science. “Once people question the safety or effectiveness of a vaccine, it can be very difficult to get them to move beyond those negative associations,” says Fu, about research he led that explained that hysteresis may describe persistent vaccine skepticism. “Hysteresis is a powerful force that is difficult to break at a societal level.”

Junk Food Ads Disproportionately Target Black and Hispanic Kids: Report – Reuters

Read article – Quotes Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and of pediatrics, in an article about a new study that found that television advertising in the U.S. for candy, fast food, sugary drinks, and other unhealthy treats continues to target mostly black and Hispanic youth. “Unfortunately, the foods and drinks most heavily targeted to children of color are high in sugar, salt and/or fat like sugary drinks, candy, and fast food,” says Emond, who was not involved in the study. “And these foods should not be consumed on a regular basis.” (Picked up by The Gazette, Ary News, WTVB, and CompuServe News.)