In the News

California Health Officials Tell Everyone to Stop Vaping Right Now – Los Angeles Times

Read article – Quotes James Sargent, the Scott M. and Lisa G. Stuart Professor, in an article reporting about how California health officials issued a warning Tuesday urging people to stop vaping immediately, joining a growing chorus of health experts advising caution around e-cigarette use following recent reports of severe lung illnesses linked to the practice.

In Tiny Doses, an Addiction Medication Moonlights as a Treatment for Chronic Pain – NHPR via NPR

Listen to story – Continued coverage of comments by Bruce Vrooman, associate professor of anesthesiology, about treating patients with complex chronic pain, and how for some patients, low-dose naltrexone appears to be more effective and well-tolerated than the big-name opioids that dominated pain management for decades. “Those patients may report that this is indeed a game-changer,” Vrooman says. “It may truly help them with their activities, help them feel better.”

In Tiny Doses, an Addiction Medication Moonlights as a Treatment for Chronic Pain – NPR

Listen to story – Quotes Bruce Vrooman, associate professor of anesthesiology, about treating patients with complex chronic pain, and how for some patients, low-dose naltrexone appears to be more effective and well-tolerated than the big-name opioids that dominated pain management for decades. “Those patients may report that this is indeed a game-changer,” Vrooman says. “It may truly help them with their activities, help them feel better.” (Picked up by WAMU.)

Study Finds Lack of Social Needs Screening at Health Care Facilities – Valley News

Read article – Quotes Taressa Fraze, a research scientist at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in a feature story about a study she led that examined whether physician practices and hospitals in the U.S. ask patients if they’re experiencing housing instability, food insecurity, utility needs, transportation needs or interpersonal violence, challenges that are priorities for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, among other healthcare groups and payers.

C-Section Babies Have a Unique Microbiome—Here’s Why That Matters Popular Science

Read article – Quotes Anne Hoen, assistant professor of epidemiology, biomedical data science, and microbiology and immunology, about a study that found that early in life, babies born by cesarean section have different gut bacteria than babies born vaginally—instead of picking up microbes from their mothers, they take on bacteria from the hospital environment. “That allowed them to show that not only is being born by C-section associated with a perturbed microbiome, but it showed nicely that this is because vaginally born babies are inheriting their mom’s microbiomes—and C-section babies aren’t doing that,” says Hoen. “That was the idea before, but this data nicely demonstrated that concept.”