In the News

NH Astronaut’s Experience Used in Research Back on Earth (Video) – WMUR

View story – A segment featuring former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, in which he reflects on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and his time on a space shuttle 21 years ago to conduct biomedical research. “Fifty years ago, when the Apollo program was landing on the moon, I was a 13-year-old boy at that time, and I thought the space program was the greatest thing ever,” says Buckey. “To me, it represented the future.”

Dartmouth Professor Who Flew on NASA Mission Backs Future Exploration of Space – Valley News

Read article – A feature story about former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, who in 1998 went on a space mission to study how entering and leaving space affects the nervous system and brain. Today, Buckey continues to conduct research for NASA and also runs the clinical hyperbaric oxygen program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. As the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaches, Buckey hopes it will rekindle a sense of awe about space travel.

Car Shopping, Handbags and Wealthy Uncles: The Quest to Explain High Drug Prices (Audio) – NPR

Listen to program – As a guest on All Things Considered, Adrienne Faerber, lecturer for The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, discusses the challenges in explaining and fixing the drug pricing system. “When you go to the pharmacy you’re not negotiating with the pharmacist for the cost of your drugs,” says Faerber. (Faerber’s comments begin at approximately 1:20.)

Ask Whether a Drug Works Before Worrying About What It Costs – Los Angeles Times

Read article – An opinion piece by Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how drug companies filed a successful lawsuit blocking the Department of Health and Human Services’ rule requiring drug commercials on television to disclose the “list price” of the medication being advertised.

Neither Patient Nor Provider Reaping Intended Rewards of ACOs – McKnight’s Long-Term Care News

Read article – Features research conducted by scientists at Dartmouth that found that accountable care organizations, designed to reduce overhead and improve health outcomes by coordinating care, may not be achieving either goal when it comes to patients with complex needs. (Similar coverage in an additional article published in McKnight’s Long-Term Care News.)