In the News

Fauci: Coronavirus Vaccine Could Be Available By End of 2020 – Vox

Read article – Quotes Kendall Hoyt, assistant professor of medicine, in an article about how Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, told Congress Tuesday that he’s “cautiously optimistic” about the development of a coronavirus vaccine by the end of this year or the beginning of 2021. “It’s conceivable we could have something in that timeline—if everything goes right,” Hoyt said. (Hoyt’s comments were originally published in an article published in Vox in May.)

What a Negative COVID-19 Test Really Means – The Atlantic

Read article – Quotes Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article that examines the meaning of testing negative for COVID-19. “If you have symptoms or you work in a place where you’re at high risk for exposure, then even with a negative test, you might want to think really hard about it,” says Woloshin.

Upper Valley Health Care Workers Attuned to Racial Inequities – Valley News

Read article – Quotes Chad Lewis, Geisel ’20, in an article about how Vermont and New Hampshire health care providers are among the growing number of people across the country who are examining their roles in perpetuating racism in the wake of the killing of George Floyd. Earlier this month, many of the nation’s health care workersincluding workers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Centertook a knee for eight minutes and 46 seconds in honor of Floyd. “It was great to see such a large group of physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers stand in solidarity with their black colleagues and to honor the life of George Floyd,” said Lewis.

The Therapist Is In—and It’s a Chatbot App – WIRED

Read article – Quotes Lisa Marsch, the Andrew G. Wallace Professor and professor of psychiatry and director of the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health, in an article about how the FDA relaxed its rules for digital therapeutic devices for psychiatric disorders in order to widen access to care during the pandemic. “Someone in the recovery process from substance use may be awake at 2 a.m. feeling at high risk of relapse, and not have anyone to talk to,” says Marsch. “But they can have something in their pocket that helps them respond to that moment in a way that doesn’t include using again.”

How Accurate Are the Tests Being Administered in the U.S.? – MSN via Medical Daily

Read article – Quotes Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about how experts from top medical institutes are now demanding that the FDA gather better evidence of the accuracy of the tests it approves for COVID-19. “In the beginning, the FDA was under a lot of pressure to get these tests onto the marketplace. But now that there are plenty of tests out there, it’s time for them to raise the bar,” said Woloshin.

What COVID-19 Antibody and Viral Testing Can and Can’t Tell You About Your Health – CNBC

Read article – Quotes Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about the challenges regarding false-negative diagnostic tests for COVID-19. “False-negative results are far more consequential [than false-positives], because infected persons who might be asymptomatic may not be isolated and can infect others,” says Woloshin. (Similar coverage in International Business Times and Medical Daily.)