In the News

Click Bait Ads Are Tied to Teen Smoking – Reuters Health

Read more – Quotes Samir Soneji, assistant professor of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about research he led that found that teens who engage with online tobacco ads are more likely to start smoking than their peers who aren’t lured by digital marketing campaigns. “One possible influence of engagement with online tobacco marketing is to make teenagers curious about and wanting to try a tobacco product,” says Soneji.

How Countries Around the World Try to Encourage Vaccination – CNN

Read article – Features comments by Tim Lahey, associate professor of medicine, medical education, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about a new policy in France that requires all children born January 1 or later to receive 11 mandatory vaccines. “We don’t see measles, mumps, rubella, polio so much anymore, so we don’t feel like we’re at risk and therefore the inconvenience, the cost, the very small risk of immunizations can feel like the bigger problem,” says Lahey.

Can a Sun Salutation a Day Keep Night Sweats at Bay? – Reuters Health

Read article – Quotes James Stahl, associate professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about a new study that found that menopausal women who practice yoga may experience more relief from symptoms like night sweats and hot flashes than their peers who don’t do this type of exercise. “All of the mind-body tools, yoga, acupuncture, qi gong, and meditation probably work through multiple mechanisms—through remodeling how the mind-body perceives sensations and signals, how the mind-body responds to those stimuli and finally through helping set or reset the mind-body’s steady state,” says Stahl, who wasn’t involved in the study.

Is More Screening a Good Thing? A Boston Global Health Chat With Researcher and Author Dr. H. Gilbert Welch – Boston’s Global Health Blog

Read article – Features an interview with H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and professor of economics and adjunct professor of business administration, in which he discusses how our screening tests are not perfect and may at times be harmful.

Walking the Shoreline: Erosion, Regrowth, and Professional Formation – JAMA

Read article – In an essay for JAMA based on her speech at this year’s White Coat ceremony, Kathryn B. Kirkland, MD MED ’86, a professor of medicine and the Dorothy and John J. Byrne, Jr., Distinguished Chair in Palliative Medicine, uses the metaphor of the erosion of shorelines to guide medical students, residents, and physicians to understand the reshaping through the erosive forces inherent with the professional formation and changes of a medical career.