In the News

Drinking Water Might Help Kids Limit Soda Consumption – The Jordan Times via Reuters Health

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and of pediatrics, about how parents need to make sure kids understand the importance of drinking water. “Parents should encourage their kids to limit (sugar-sweetened beverages), including flavored waters and sports drinks, and to choose water instead,” says Emond.

Many Anti-Vaxxers Don’t Trust Big Pharma. There’s a Reason for That. – Undark

Read article – Quotes Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about research he conducted with the late Lisa Schwartz, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, that found that spending on drug marketing, disease awareness campaigns, health services, and laboratory testing increased from $17.7 billion in 1997 to $29.9 billion in 2016.

Stanford Surgical Resident Auriel August Discusses the Critical Need for More Diversity in Medicine – Forbes

Read article – A feature story about Auriel August, MED ’17, a Stanford general surgery resident who started the Twitter account @blackgrlsurgeon to encourage diversity in medicine and serve as a role model for other aspiring black female surgeons. The article mentions that as a Dartmouth medical student, August spent the summer of 2014 working in a hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, which inspired her to also dedicate part of her time to addressing health disparities abroad.

Imposter Syndrome – AAMC

Read article – An opinion piece by Roshini Pinto-Powell, associate professor of medicine and of medical education, in which she discusses the impact of imposter syndrome on medical students, and shares advice on how to recognize and counteract imposter traits. “Once you recognize that you might have Imposter Syndrome, seek out an advisor or mentor. It is important to gain perspective as you will realize that you are not alone,” says Pinto-Powell. “Embrace being a novice and focus on developing a growth mindset. Each student enters medical school with different strengths. Comparing yourself to your peers is unhelpful, but sharing expertise among colleagues lifts everyone’s performance.”