In the News

Online Zine ‘Bluum’ Frames Queerness in New Light – Seven Days

Read article – A feature story about Bailey Johnson, a data assistant at the Geisel School of Medicine, who founded Bluum Zine—an online-only publication dedicated to showcasing the art and written works of queer creatives. Johnson was inspired to start the publication after watching many of her peers at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vt., pursue their passion projects.

Audit Shows PA Nursing Homes Understaffed, Problem Projected to Get Worse – WESA

Listen to story – Quotes Ellen Flaherty, assistant professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about how an audit of Pennsylvania nursing homes warns that staffing levels at these facilities are insufficient and on track to get worse. “Nursing home direct care workers are currently, and have been historically, underpaid. And that is part, I think, of the reason why people choose to work in other environments and other places,” says Flaherty.

Column: Drug Prices Tell Us Nothing About Their Worth – Valley News via Los Angeles Times

Read article – Continued coverage of an opinion piece by Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how drug companies filed a successful lawsuit blocking the Department of Health and Human Services’ rule requiring drug commercials on television to disclose the “list price” of the medication being advertised.

Should You Start Colorectal Cancer Screening Before Age 50? – Consumer Reports

Read article – Quotes Douglas Robertson, professor of medicine and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about guidelines released last year by the American Cancer Society suggesting that people should begin screening for colorectal cancer at age 45. “Screening is always a trade-off with benefit and harm,” says Robertson. “The trade-off is that as you go to younger and younger age groups, the absolute risk for getting or dying from cancer is lower, so more and more people would need to be screened to find the one case of colorectal cancer hiding in these younger age groups.”