In the News

There is no magic wand to fix health care – The Hill

Read article – An opinion piece by Carrie Colla, associate professor of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in which she discusses the complexity of improving American healthcare. “Politicians in office and on the campaign trail offer silver bullets and suggest no one will have to compromise. This simply isn’t the case; our recent study shows yet again why silver bullet thinking is misguided,” says Colla. “Real spending reduction in healthcare will require tradeoffs along at least one dimension: access, patient experience and choice, or quality.” (Colla is participating in this year’s Dartmouth Public Voices project.)

Smokers Have More Complications After Skin Cancer Surgery – Reuters

Read article – Quotes James Dinulos, clinical associate professor of surgery, about a new study that found that complications after skin cancer surgery may be more common in smokers and former smokers. “Smoking adversely impacts the early phases of wound healing, leading to increased complications that were outlined in the study,” says Dinulos, who wasn’t involved in the study. “It is likely that chemicals in smoke impact the integrity of the skin over the long-term, especially if the patient is a high pack-year smoker, and some of the physiological changes may not be reversible.” (Picked up by Physician’s Weekly, Business Standard, Pledge Times.)

Dartmouth Professor Who Flew on NASA Mission Backs Future Exploration of Space – Concord Monitor via Valley News

Read article – Continued coverage of a feature story about former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, who in 1998 went on a space mission to study how entering and leaving space affects the nervous system and brain. Today, Buckey continues to conduct research for NASA and also runs the clinical hyperbaric oxygen program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. As the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaches, Buckey hopes it will rekindle a sense of awe about space travel.

‘The Coolest Thing Ever:’ NH Astronaut, Vt. Museum Reflect on 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing (Video) – NBC Boston

View story – A segment featuring former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, in which he discusses spending 16 days in orbit studying the effects of space on the body, and reflects on Saturday’s 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Buckey said he views the 50th anniversary of the moon landing as an opportunity to excite a generation about the power of science, and to chart bold goals for achievement.

NH Astronaut’s Experience Used in Research Back on Earth (Video) – WMUR

View story – A segment featuring former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, in which he reflects on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and his time on a space shuttle 21 years ago to conduct biomedical research. “Fifty years ago, when the Apollo program was landing on the moon, I was a 13-year-old boy at that time, and I thought the space program was the greatest thing ever,” says Buckey. “To me, it represented the future.”

Dartmouth Professor Who Flew on NASA Mission Backs Future Exploration of Space – Valley News

Read article – A feature story about former astronaut Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, who in 1998 went on a space mission to study how entering and leaving space affects the nervous system and brain. Today, Buckey continues to conduct research for NASA and also runs the clinical hyperbaric oxygen program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. As the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaches, Buckey hopes it will rekindle a sense of awe about space travel.

Car Shopping, Handbags and Wealthy Uncles: The Quest to Explain High Drug Prices (Audio) – NPR

Listen to program – As a guest on All Things Considered, Adrienne Faerber, lecturer for The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, discusses the challenges in explaining and fixing the drug pricing system. “When you go to the pharmacy you’re not negotiating with the pharmacist for the cost of your drugs,” says Faerber. (Faerber’s comments begin at approximately 1:20.)

Ask Whether a Drug Works Before Worrying About What It Costs – Los Angeles Times

Read article – An opinion piece by Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how drug companies filed a successful lawsuit blocking the Department of Health and Human Services’ rule requiring drug commercials on television to disclose the “list price” of the medication being advertised.