In the News

Addressing the Crisis in Older Adult Mental Health – Behavioral Healthcare Executive

Read article – An article that mentions that Stephen Bartels, professor of psychiatry, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, served as a panelist for an event titled “Addressing the Crisis in Older Adult Mental Health” as part of Mental Health Awareness Month. Bartels discusses how few seniors currently have access to the most rudimentary mental health services.

End-of-Life Care Costs Declined Last Decade – Home Health Care News

Read article – Quotes William Weeks, professor of psychiatry, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about a new study he led that found that Medicare spending on older Americans during their end-of-life years was down toward the start of last decade. The study upends the notion that older adults, many of whom end up on hospice care in the last few weeks of life, are largely responsible for driving up U.S. health care costs. (Similar coverage in the Valley News.)

F.D.A. Approves First Drug Designed to Prevent Migraines – The New York Times

Read article – Quotes Stewart Tepper, professor of neurology, about how the first medicine designed to prevent migraines was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, ushering in what many experts believe will be a new era in treatment for people who suffer the most severe form of these headaches. “For now, they look fantastic,” says Tepper. “They shake the ground under our feet. They will change the way we treat migraine.” (Picked up by The Globe and Mail, Independent RecorderThe Bulletin, Global Financial Market Review, and TimesUnion. Similar coverage in Syracuse.com, HealioPain News Network, Neurology Advisor, and Medcape.)

Sports Drinks Still Popular With Teens – NewHampshire.com via Reuters

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and assistant professor of pediatrics, about a new study that found that more than half of U.S. high school students still have sports drinks at least once a week and their ranks are growing, but that fewer teens have these sugary, calorie-laden beverages every day. (Picked up by New Hampshire Union Leader.)

Patients Are Recording Their Doctor’s Visits. But Should They? – Healthcare Analytics News

Read article – Features research coauthored by Glyn Elwyn, professor of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and Paul Barr, assistant professor of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, that found that patients might be further jeopardizing the sanctity of their protected health information thanks to their growing desire to digitally record their doctor’s visit.

Hope for the Holiday: Residential Recovery Centers Offer Refuge to NH Moms Struggling With Addiction – New Hampshire Union Leader

Read article – Quotes Julia Frew, assistant professor of psychiatry, obstetrics and gynecology, and of medical education; and the medical director for Moms in Recovery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; about how the work DHMC has done supporting moms struggling with addiction should be duplicated as community-based programs.

Sports Drinks Remain Popular With U.S. Teens – CBC via Reuters

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and assistant professor of pediatrics, about a new study that found that more than half of U.S. high school students still have sports drinks at least once a week and their ranks are growing, but that fewer teens have these sugary, calorie-laden beverages every day. “I do think that the marketing of these drinks as part of a lifestyle that is not just active—but includes extreme fitness and excellence in sports—influences teens,” says Emond, who wasn’t involved in the study. “It comes across as an aspirational product.”

Sports Drinks Remain Popular With U.S. Teens – Reuters

Read article – Quotes Jennifer Emond, assistant professor of biomedical data science and assistant professor of pediatrics, about a new study that found that more than half of U.S. high school students still have sports drinks at least once a week and their ranks are growing, but that fewer teens have these sugary, calorie-laden beverages every day. “I do think that the marketing of these drinks as part of a lifestyle that is not just active—but includes extreme fitness and excellence in sports—influences teens,” says Emond, who wasn’t involved in the study. “It comes across as an aspirational product.”

Study Calls for Closer Evaluation of Pregnant Women Who Have Had Previous C-Sections – The Globe and Mail

Read article – Quotes Sarah Munro, a postdoctoral fellow at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about a new study focusing on pregnant women who have had a cesarean section that found that there is a need to better evaluate risks during a subsequent pregnancy and to bring down the overall C-section rates in Canada.

The Golden State Killer Case Shows How Swiftly We’re Losing Genetic Privacy – Vox via The Conversation

Read article – Continued coverage of an opinion piece by Norman Paradis, professor of medicine, in which he discusses how California law enforcement announced the possible capture of a long-sought serial killer using public DNA databases, and how the event highlights that when you send off a cheek swab to one of the private genome companies, you may sacrifice not just your own privacy but that of your family and your ancestors.