In the News articles

What Going to Mars Will Do to Our Bodies – FiveThirtyEight

Read article – Quotes Jay Buckey, professor of medicine and adjunct professor of engineering, in an article that examines the everyday health problems that might occur on a trip to Mars, which could span years. NASA has highlighted 23 particular health risks of long-duration space travel that require further work to mitigate before a crewed spacecraft takes off for Mars in the 2030s.

Why Are More Young Americans Getting Colon Cancer? – NHPR via NPR

Read article – Continued coverage of comments by H. Gilbert Welch, professor ofmedicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how what looks like additional cancers in people under 50 may simply be cases that are being diagnosed earlier than they would have been. Welch also notes that maybe the apparent rise in colon cancer among young people is real, but it won’t affect them as they age. “The biology of the disease may be different between the young and the old,” says Welch.

Why Are More Young Americans Getting Colon Cancer? – NPR

Read article – Quotes H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how what looks like additional cancers in people under 50 may simply be cases that are being diagnosed earlier than they would have been. Welch also notes that maybe the apparent rise in colon cancer among young people is real, but it won’t affect them as they age. “The biology of the disease may be different between the young and the old,” says Welch.

Born in the ’90s? Your Colon Cancer Risk Could Be Rising – CNN

Read article – Quotes H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about a new study that found colon and rectal cancer rates are rising sharply for Americans under 55. “I wouldn’t make too much of this,” says Welch, who was not involved in the study. The numbers, Welch said, are too small to warrant the attention this trend is getting.

At the Hospitals: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Radiologists Receive National Awards – Valley News

Read article Jocelyn Chertoff, chair and professor of radiology and professor of obstetrics and gynecology; Petra Lewis, professor of radiology and of obstetrics and gynecology; and Nancy McNulty, associate professor of radiology, were recently honored by the Association of University Radiologists. Chertoff received the Gold Medal—the organization’s highest honor—which recognizes distinguished service or contributions to the association, academic radiology or the field of radiology. Chertoff and Lewis each received an achievement award for significant contributions to the advancement of education in radiology—Lewis for education and Chertoff for service. McNulty received an excellence in education award from the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology, part of the Association of University Radiologists. The award honors an educator who has made significant contributions to medical student radiology education nationally.

Work Can Be Bad for Your Health – Fosters.com

Read article – Quotes Robert McLellan, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how work can be hazardous to your health. “Work holds the promise of supporting and promoting health,” McLellan said. “It also carries the risk of injury, illness, and death.”

Does Mercury in Fish Play a Role in ALS? – U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News

Read article – Quotes Elijah Stommel, professor of neurology, who was the lead author of a recent study that found eating mercury-laden seafood may raise the risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). “For most people, eating fish is part of a healthy diet,” says Stommel. “But questions remain about the possible impact of mercury in fish.” (Additional coverage: Tuscon.com, The Post StarPhilly.com, Daily Mail, and Medical News Today.)

Program to Train Doctors to Spot Patients Abusing Drugs – U.S. News & World Report via Associated Press

Read article – A feature story about a new initiative run by the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the New Hampshire Area Health Education Center that will train health care professionals at five colleges to screen patients who are at risk of, or may already be, abusing drugs or alcohol. The goal of the initiative is to reduce substance abuse rates that are among the highest in the nation. (Additional coverage: NH1, San Luis Obispo, Charlotte Observer, and the Valley News.)

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