Tag Archives: pediatrics

Geisel MD-PhD student Yike Jiang and David Leib, PhD, professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Geisel. (Photo: Jon Gilbert Fox)

Dartmouth Researchers Find that Mothers’ Antibodies Against HSV-1 Can Protect Their Infants from the Virus

Dartmouth Researchers Find that Mothers’ Antibodies Against HSV-1 Can Protect Their Infants from the Virus

A team of Dartmouth researchers has found that mothers who have developed antibodies against the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) can pass these antibodies to the nervous systems of their infants, protecting them from acquiring the virus.

Image of baby-shutterstock_246399445

NICU Admissions Increasing for Normal Birth Weight and Term Infants

A new Dartmouth study found that admission rates to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are increasing for newborns of all weights. In effect, NICUs are increasingly caring for normal, or near normal, birth weight and term infants. The study, recently published online by JAMA Pediatrics, raises questions about possible overuse of this highly specialized and expensive care for some newborns.

Christine Taylor is one of the volunteer cuddlers in the Geisel/CHaD project that developed a new model of care for in utero opioid-exposed and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome-affected newborns. Photo by Mark Washburn.

AAMC Award for Geisel and CHaD Project to Improve Care of Opioid-Exposed Newborns

A team of Geisel faculty, students, and pediatric staff at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock received a Clinical Care Innovation Challenge Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges for creating a new model of care for in utero opioid-exposed and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome-affected newborns.

Drug Derived From Scorpion Venom Will Target Brain Cancer in Kids

Seattle Times – Quotes David Roberts, professor of surgery and neurology, on news that Seattle Children’s Hospital will be testing a new dye derived from scorpion venom that lights up cancer cells so surgeons can see — and remove — deadly brain tumors. Roberts and other colleagues have also been testing a similar drug compound, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), which targets glial tumors.

Top