Post Tagged with: "faculty"

Dennis McCullough Passes

Dennis McCullough Passes

We are so saddened to inform you that Dennis McCullough, MD died unexpectedly, Friday June 3rd in Bar Harbor, Maine while attending a conference.

Dennis was a beloved and deeply engaged member of both the Department of Community and Family Medicine and the larger Upper Valley community for over thirty years as a practicing family physician and geriatrician.

Remembering Ron Taylor: Mentor, Teacher, Friend

Remembering Ron Taylor: Mentor, Teacher, Friend

Charisma—we can’t always define it, but we know it when we see it. And by all accounts Ron Taylor was charismatic. A professor of microbiology and immunology at Geisel School of Medicine, Taylor died on March 26 at age 62 of a heart attack. His good-natured personality and intellectual assets, beloved by faculty, students, and staff alike, were well suited to academe.

Most Popular Stories of 2015

Most Popular Stories of 2015

As 2015 draws to a close, we’d like to share with you some of the most popular stories on Geisel NewsCenter this year. From the Geisel Communications team, Happy Holidays and have a safe and Happy New Year!

Geisel Presents Annual Awards to Students and Faculty

Geisel Presents Annual Awards to Students and Faculty

On Friday, June 5, faculty and graduating medical students were recognized for extraordinary achievements at the annual Geisel School of Medicine Awards Ceremony. Held in the Hopkins Center’s Moore Theater, the event honored excellence in academic achievement, research, community service, teaching, and much more.

The First Black Female Astronaut on Fear, Audacity, and the Importance of Inclusion

Fast Company – A profile piece on Mae Jemison, adjunct professor of community and family medicine, who was an astronaut on the space shuttle Endeavor and was the first woman of color to go into space. In the article, Jemison states that one of the ways she has become so successful is learning her strengths and working on weaknesses, and that she believes “the key is more an issue of balance than to focus on one in hopes the other will disappear.”