Lab Members

Jay Dunlap

Jay Dunlap
Principal Investigator - Curriculum Vitae

Jay earned dual BS degrees from the University of Washington and a PhD in biology from Harvard, then carried out postdoctoral research in molecular genetics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He joined the DMS faculty in 1984. He has worked on the molecular basis of circadian rhythms for several decades, chiefly using the Neurospora model but within the past decade also using mice and mammalian cell culture models.


Jennifer Loros

Jennifer Loros
Principal Investigator - Curriculum Vitae

Jennifer earned a BA and PhD in biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She then came to the Geisel School of Medicine as a post-doc, joining the faculty in 1988. Her work is focused on the genetic dissection of the circadian clock, clock-controlled gene expression and fungal photobiology.


Tina Kelliher
Postdoc

Tina completed her B.S. in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology from Gettysburg College in 2011 and earned her Ph.D. in Genetics & Genomics from Duke University in 2017. Her current research projects include identifying molecular players in nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian period length, cross-talk between the clock and cellular metabolism, and post-transcriptional regulation of core clock factors by RNA-binding proteins.


Bin Wang

Bin Wang
Postdoc - Curriculum Vitae


Jen Worthen
Postdoc

Jen received her Ph.D. for her work investigating plant hormone signaling pathways in rice from Dartmouth College in 2018. She has been tackling the circadian control of biology using bioinformatics. More specifically, she is working to identify circadian processes in beige adipocytes using RNA-seq. Her second project is the study of circadian nuclear proteins in the fungal model organism Neuropora crassa using TMT-MS to identify changes in protein levels and phosphorylation state over the circadian day. This allows us to follow critically-low abundance proteins like transcription factors, and essential modifications of these proteins, for the first time.


Shan Chen

Shan Chen
Graduate Student

Shan was raised in windy Oklahoma then ventured north to snowy western New York to obtain his B.S. in Microbiology & Immunology from the University of Rochester in 2009. He then traveled south to work as a lab tech in sunny El Paso, Texas. He again ventured north to Dartmouth and joined the Dunlap/Loros labs in 2014. His research interests include bio-engineering and the intersection between the clock and the immune system.


Brad Bartholomai

Brad Bartholomai
Graduate Student

Brad is from Nebraska, where he earned a B.S. in Microbiology from the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Prior to developing an interest in biology, he spent several years working as a performing artist in musical theater, including a turn in the North American tour of the acclaimed musical CATS. Brad is interested in elucidating the spatial and temporal dynamics of the Neurospora crassa clock at the single cell level using qualitative and quantitative microscopy techniques. He is also associated with the laboratory of Dr. Amy Gladfelter, who advises him in microscopy and fungal cell biology.


Adrienne K. Mehalow

Adrienne Mehalow
Graduate Student

Adrienne has a BS in Cell Biology / Biochemistry from Bucknell University. Prior to joining the Dunlap-Loros lab in 2016, Adrienne worked in beautiful Bar Harbor, Maine where she researched mouse models of human diseases at The Jackson Laboratory. Her current interests are temperature compensation of the circadian clock and utilizing bioinformatics to understand patterns of gene expression. Outside of the lab Adrienne is active in Dartmouth’s chapter of Graduate Women in Science and Engineering (GWISE) and volunteers at the White River Junction VA Medical Center.


Zuzana Burdikova
Lab Manager


Wei Wang

Wei Wang
Lab Tech


Glinda

Glinda

I am Glinda, the Good Bitch. In 2014 shortly after birth I moved from South Royalton VT to an independent position associated with the PIs. In the lab I am chiefly responsible for morale and protection against predators.