Genetics News!

Understanding Scleroderma's 'Social Network' May Lead to New Treatments
Michael Whitfield, PhD, a translational genetics researcher at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine, has earned a second highly competitive award from the Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust for his pioneering work on the rare autoimmune disease systemic scleroderma.

SSc-related Pulmonary Fibrosis Linked to Macrophages in Big Data Presentation at SSc World Congress 2016
A new model, produced by analyzing 10 different systemic sclerosis (SSc) gene expression data sets, showed that pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in SSc is likely the result of an initial insult activating the interferon signaling pathway. Researchers believe that the uncovered processes might reflect fibrotic processes in all SSc-affected tissues.

Geisel Researchers Publish New Study
Period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock.

Geisel Researcher Receives Prestigious $3.7M National Institutes of Health Pioneer Award
Giovanni Bosco, PhD, an associate professor of genetics at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine, has been awarded a prestigious $3.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The five-year Pioneer Award supports exceptional investigators pursuing bold, highly innovative research projects.

Predator-induced changes in Drosophila behavior and germline physiology are socially communicated
Behavioral adaptation to environmental threats and subsequent social transmission of adaptive behavior has evolutionary implications.

Falk Foundation Grant Advances Translational Research in Scleroderma
Ground-breaking discoveries about a rare and debilitating family of diseases has earned Michael Whitfield, PhD, a translational genetics researcher at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine, a highly competitive Catalyst Award from the Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust.

Research Finds Cells Respond to Stress by Folding and Unfolding Their Genomes
Finding that chromatin architectural proteins are redistributed as cells respond to stressors such as heat was not the expected outcome for Dartmouth's Giovanni Bosco, PhD and collaborator Victor Corces, PhD of Emory University.

Why Some Mushrooms Glow in the Dark
Dartmouth's Jay Dunlap and colleagues from Brazil's Instituto de Quimica-Universidade de Sao Paulo have published a new study that takes a look at why mushrooms glow.

Dartmouth Investigators Identify Key Pathways Underlying Different Subsets of Systemic Sclerosis
Why do some patients with systemic sclerosis respond to therapy while others do not? The answer may lie in the fine nuances of a patient's disease; some patients with similar disease symptoms appear to have distinct biological pathways driving their diseases.