Overview

Dartmouth College

“with permission from Dartmouth College”

Predoctoral Training

Predoctoral Program
The predoctoral training program draws primarily from three PhD programs at Dartmouth.

1) Graduate Program in Psychological and Brain Sciences (PBS). The Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences offers graduate training leading to a doctoral degree in Experimental Psychology or Cognitive Neuroscience. Research within the department is focused on several areas, including systems and behavioral neuroscience, cognitive and computational neuroscience, and social and affective neuroscience. Students conduct research in a state-of-the-art facility that includes extensive laboratory space and an research-dedicated MRI machine. Because of its moderate size, the program emphasizes a close working relationship between faculty and students. Annual stipends are provided to all PhD students in good standing and students are not charged tuition or fees. Graduates of the program have been very successful in obtaining academic positions, and the most recent National Research Council survey (2010) found our program ranked 2nd in the country in placing students in academic programs.

2) Program in Health Services Research in The Dartmouth Institute (TDI). This PhD program provides multidisciplinary training in the conduct of research and teaching in areas of special expertise at TDI. The goal is to produce outstanding researchers who can address critical gaps in healthcare and fundamentally improve the capacity of health care systems, including socioeconomically disadvantaged and minority populations. Disciplines represented by the TDI faculty include clinical medicine, psychiatry, decision science, economics, epidemiology, health services research, geography, political science, psychology, public health and sociology.

3) Translational Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM). Trainees with explicit interests in the Neuroscience track at PEMM are candidates for the T32. This program provides training in the conduct of research on brain structure and function as related to psychiatric and addictive disorders, and with training in neuroimaging, psychopharmacology, and intervention research aimed at better understanding and treating those suffering from Co-occurring Disorders (COD).

The predoctoral training program will also consider trainees from other PhD programs at Dartmouth that are relevant to training and research in the area of Science of Co-Occurring Disorders.

Programming
Doctoral students and mentors develop individualized training plans based on the trainee's experience and interests in relation to addiction, mental illness, research methods, and career interests. Trainees will be immersed in their graduate program's didactic course learning and will devote approximately 20 hrs per week to research training. Predoctoral trainees will typically participate for 3-4 years, depending on their graduate program requirements and entry-level status.

Core T32 Training Components
Training elements of the T32 include a survey course on Co-occurring Disorders, the Behavioral Health Research weekly seminar, four methods-focused seminars, a Center for Technology and Behavioral Health seminar, a capstone experience and project, responsible conduct of research training, professional development/grant and manuscript writing seminar, research retreats, local and national scientific conference attendance and presentations.

The capstone project is designed to ensure that trainees receive true exposure to research that spans addiction and other mental disorders. Each trainee in collaboration with their primary and a secondary mentor develop a capstone project that includes either or both coursework or an experiential practicum that addresses an aspect of Co-occurring Disorders research that is not part of the trainee's work with their primary mentor. The plan ideally would results in work that translates into a publication.

Participation in these core activities is determined by trainees and their mentors.

Benefits
Predoctoral trainees receive (1) tuition remission, (2) a stipend commensurate with the NIH stipend levels (currently $24,324/year), (3) health insurance, (4) support for conference travel.

If interested, contact the Program Director, Alan J. Budney, Ph.D. (T32 Director) at Alan.J.Budney@Dartmouth.edu or David Bucci, Ph.D. (Predoctoral Program Director) at David.J.Bucci@Dartmouth.edu.


Postdoctoral Training Program

Postdoctoral Training Program
The postdoctoral program trains research scientists at diverse stages of their training careers and with varied areas of interest in anticipation of careers involving research related to addiction and mental illness. PhDs and MDs are eligible as postdoctoral fellows. Training involves exposure to and experience in trans-disciplinary and translational approaches to the public health problems of COD. We have developed a core set of common training elements and requirements to ensure that all trainees are exposed to a basic set of knowledge and experiences essential for conducting effective COD research.

Programming
We typically require a planned two-year commitment from prospective fellows to allow time for adequate mentoring/education, development of skills, and productivity to effectively launch their academic careers. A third year of training is considered if requested by the primary mentor and trainee.

Core Training Components
Training elements include a survey course on Co-Occurring Disorders, the Behavioral Health Research weekly seminar, four methods-focused seminars, a Center for Technology and Behavioral Health seminar, a capstone project, responsible conduct of research training, professional development / grant and manuscript writing seminar, research retreats, local and national scientific conference attendance and presentations. Participation in these core activities is determined by trainees and their mentors.

Together, fellows and mentors develop individualized training plans based on the trainee's knowledge and experience base in relation to addictions, mental illness, research methods, and career interests. Trainees become immersed in their mentor's research laboratories, in addition to pursuing collaborative or independent projects with other Investigators. Development of project and laboratory management skills is a primary goal. The primary mentor and training program director work with trainees to outline a training experience that extends their previous training and ensures progress toward developing into a trans-disciplinary scientist knowledgeable about science related to Co-Occurring Disorders.

To ensure that trainees receive true exposure to research that spans addiction and other mental disorders, each trainee in collaboration with their primary and a secondary mentor will develop a capstone project. The capstone includes either or both coursework or an experiential practicum that addresses an aspect of Co-Occurring Disorders research that is not part of the trainees work with their primary mentor. The plan also requires specification of a project that ideally would result in a publication. Through this process, trainees attain the content necessary to become independent researchers in their field, and that, in addition to understanding the nature of Co-Occurring Disorders, they will have a comprehensive understanding of at least one discipline complementary to their primary strength.

By the end of their program, trainees should either have prepared for submission or submitted an NIH grant proposal (e.g., BSTART, K, R03, R21 awards).

Benefits
Postdoctoral trainees receive (1) a stipend commensurate with experience using the NIH stipend levels: (currently $48,432 for a first year fellow), (2) health insurance, (3) support for conference travel.

If interested, contact Alan J. Budney, Ph.D. (T32 Director) at alan.j.budney@dartmouth.edu or Catherine Stanger, Ph.D. (Postdoctoral Program Director) at catherine.stanger@dartmouth.edu.