In the News

African American Women Less Likely to Receive Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

Science World Report – Dartmouth researchers found that the majority of the African American women who undergo mastectomies are 55 percent less likely to receive breast reconstruction irrespective of where they received their care. The study has filled a gap in addressing the issue as to whether racial disparities in breast reconstruction were due to disproportionate use of hospitals with services available.

Does Facebook Really Make Us Narcissistic?

Huffington Post – Research Assistant Professor Joanna Fanos is quoted on her views about the correlation between narcissism and social media in this excerpt from Jeffrey Kluger’s The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, Your Office, Your Bed—In Your World.

Research Shines Light on Nighttime Symptoms of PTSD

Columbia Chronicle – For many who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder, nighttime symptoms manifest as insomnia, nightmares, and disturbed sleep patterns. According to Matthew J. Friedman, professor of psychiatry at Geisel, “There is some debate about whether PTSD is primarily a fault of the disturbed sleep patterns or if the disturbed sleep is a consequence of all the other deregulation that occurs from the disorder, but there is likely some basis for both perspectives.”

The 125 Percent Solution for American Health Care

VOX – Americans are charged higher prices for health care than anyone else. The article cites research conducted by Professor of Medicine Elliot Fisher and colleagues, which found that the prices that Americans pay for medical procedures and services vary wildly depending on where they are, who they are, whether they’re insured, whom they’re insured by, and which hospital they go to.

With ‘Bucket’ Donations Pouring In, Maine Lab Expects More ALS Work

Portland Press Herald – Researches in northern New England will benefit from more than $100 million in donations raised by The ALS Bucket Challenge for the ALS foundation. The article quotes Elijah Stommel, professor of neurology at Geisel, and discusses his research on the connection between ALS and algae blooms. “The more money is poured into this,” Stommel said, “the more chances we have for improvements in therapies.”