In the News

People Like Us: How Our Brains View Others

The Conversation – Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Professor of Physiology and Neurobiology Leslie Henderson poses the question, “is there something in our neural circuits that leads us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who may differ?”

Retesting Breast Cancer Axioms

The New York Times – Cites research by Professor of Medicine H. Gilbert Welch and Honor Passow, curriculum designer and learning specialist at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, which found that if a 50-year-old woman is screened annually for a decade, she has a 50 percent chance […]

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Hartland Scientist Wins Breakthrough

Valley News – Former tenured professor at Geisel Victor Ambros was one of six 2015 life science Breakthrough Prize laureates, who each won $3 million on Sunday, for the discovery of genetic regulation by microRNAs, a class of tiny molecules that can prevent messenger RNA from transmitting genetic information.

Retesting Breast Cancer Axioms

The New York Times – Cites research by Professor of Medicine H. Gilbert Welch and Honor Passow, curriculum designer and learning specialist at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, which found that if a 50-year-old woman is screened annually for a decade, she has a 50 percent chance of receiving a false-positive diagnosis somewhere along the way.

Lung Cancer Screening Can Be Cost Effective, Study Reports

U.S. News and World Report via HealthDay News – Discusses a study by Professor of Radiology William Black, which concluded that lung cancer screenings performed by skilled professionals on a very specific set of long-time smokers, could cost less for each year of quality life gained than the generally accepted $100,000-per-year threshold for cost effectiveness.

An Epidemic of Thyroid Cancer?

The New York Times – An opinion piece by Professor of Medicine Gilbert Welch, which discusses the rising number of diagnoses for thyroid cancer in South Korea, and the dangers of what he calls an “epidemic of diagnosis.”