COVID-19 Information

Edit Entry | Edit CV

Julie PW Bynum, MD, MPH

Title(s):
Adjunct Professor of The Dartmouth Institute

Additional Titles/Positions/Affiliations:
Co-Director, Data Analytic Core
previous Associate Director, Center for Health Policy Research

Department(s):
The Dartmouth Institute

Education:
MD Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 1997
MPH Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene & Public Health 1996
BS Union College, Schenectady, NY 1992

Programs:
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice

Websites:
http://tdi.dartmouth.edu/

Contact Information:

WTRB Level 5
1 Medical Center Drive
Lebanon NH 03756

Phone: 603-653-0827
Fax: 603-653-0896
Email: julie.bynum@dartmouth.edu

Assistant: Kathy Stroffolino
Asst. Phone: 603-653-0881
Asst. Email: kathy.stroffolino@dartmouth.edu


Professional Interests:

Julie P.W. Bynum, M.D., M.P.H. is Associate Professor of Medicine at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. Dr. Bynum’s work is focused on healthcare delivery for an aging population. Dr. Bynum has been a Robert Wood Johnson Physician Faculty Scholar and a National Institute of Aging Beeson Scholar to study quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery to high-risk elderly.

One of Dr. Bynum’s contributions to the field has been to develop a method of creating “virtual” physician-hospital networks that were used in the conceptual development of the Accountable Care Organization legislation. She continued her policy-relevant efforts as a 2011-2013 Health & Aging Policy Fellow funded by the Atlantic Philanthropies and as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee that published “Vital Signs: Core Metrics for Health and Health Care Progress.” She also is the lead author on a Dartmouth Atlas report titled, “Our Parents, Ourselves: Healthcare for an Aging Population.”

Her active NIH-funded research program covers areas related to aging populations including: “Optimizing Osteoporotic Fracture Care Outcomes”; “Efficiency of Care for High Cost High Need Medicare Beneficiaries”; and “Cognitive Decline Relationship with Healthcare Costs and Hospitalization Risk” as well as other studies.

Grant Information:

2014/09/01-2017/06/30
R21 AG045618-01A1, National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Bynum (PI)
Relationship of Cognitive Decline with Healthcare Costs and Hospitalization Risk

The goal of this project is to examine how the spectrum of cognitive decline in older persons relates to healthcare use trajectories and spending. Specifically, after linkage of the NHS to Medicare claims data, this study will compare utilization among NHS participants versus the general Medicare population and then begin to explore how level of cognitive decline relates to costs and utilization.
Role: PI

2014/01/01-2016/12/31
#2013-0238, The John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc.
Bynum (PI)
High Cost, High Need: Costs and Fragmentation of Care for Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Diseases

The goal of this project is to help policy makers, health systems, and other stakeholders better understand how to improve the quality of care for high-need older adults by studying how primary care is delivered and by which Medicaid and Medicare providers.
Role: PI

2012/12/01-2017/11/30
P01 AG19783, National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Skinner (PI)
Causes and Consequences of Health Care Efficiency

The goal of this Program Project is to evaluate the U.S. health care system and consider ways to improve its efficiency – better quality and lower costs – using survey and administrative data. Project 1, Healthcare Efficiency among High Need, High Cost Patients, focuses on the effects of fragmentation of care and market changes on people with multimorbidity. The Data Core
Role: Project 1 Lead, Data Core Lead

2013/09/30-2018/06/30
U01AG046830, National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Skinner (PI)
Technology Diffusion, Health Outcomes, and Healthcare Expenditures

This proposal seeks to measure the impact of technology diffusion in healthcare, whether for highly effective treatments (with a large impact on health outcomes) or for expensive treatments with unknown value (with a large impact on expenditures). The research group will use results from these aims to return to the central hypothesis: can observed differences in treatment-specific diffusion explain observed patterns in regional variations in health outcomes and spending?
Role: Co-Investigator

2012/09/01-2017/08/31
P60 AR 062799, Musculoskeletal Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center, NIAMS
Tosteson (Center PI)
Optimizing Fracture Care Outcomes: A Comparative Effectiveness Approach

The goal of this project, as part of the Center grant, is to quantify the potential clinical and economic value of alternative interventions, such as medication use and setting of rehabilitations, to improve post-fracture care using decision-analytic modeling.
Role: CPI Project

12/01/2015-8/31/19
R01 AT009003, NCCIH
Davis (PI) - University of Michigan
The Availability of Chiropractic Care and Use of Health Services for Back Pain

The overall objective of this project is to rigorously examine the relationship between availability of chiropractic care and utilization, expenditures, and care for nonspecific back pain.
Role: Sub-award PI

4/1/15-3/31/20
RO1 AG048071, National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Hollenbeck (PI) - University of Michigan
Accountable Care Organizations and the Diffusion of New Surgical Procedures

The overall goal of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of ACOs on the diffusion of new surgical procedures, important for anticipating the broader impact of health reform on patient care.
Role: Sub-award PI

R01 DK105050, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Grodstein (PI) - Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Urinary Incontinence Epidemiology and Care Seeking

The overall goals of this R01 are to provide data to inform decisions about urinary incontience care seeking and management, with the aim of reducing this burden. The study is a collaboration of the Nurse’s Health Study and Dartmouth, combing survey and Medicare claims data.
Role: Sub-award PI

R21 AG051001, National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Kang (PI) - Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Advance Care Planning and Health Care Utilization in Aging Women

The goal of this study is use prospectively collected survey information about discussions and execution of advance care planning in the Nurse’s Health Study to examine the relationship with end-of-life care outcomes measured in Medicare claims data.
Role: Sub-award PI


Selected Publications:

 

Resources, methods, and data infrastructure to promote research in dementia care, caregiving, and services.
Pike KJ, Fazio S, Bynum JPW, Travison TG, Wendler D, Mor V
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2021 Jul;69(7):1793-1800. doi: 10.1111/jgs.17339.
PMID: 34245589

The Most Common Medications Billed to the Medicare Hospice Benefit Among Hospice Beneficiaries in the U.S.
Gerlach LB, Powell V, Zhang L, Bynum JPW, Maust DT
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2021 May 26; pii: S0885-3924(21)00368-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.05.016. Epub 2021 May 26.
PMID: 34051294

The Relationship Between Healthcare Provider Availability and Conservative Versus Non-conservative Treatment for Back Pain Among Older Americans.
Anderson BR, Yakusheva O, Liu H, Bynum JPW, Davis MA
J Gen Intern Med. 2021 May 24; doi: 10.1007/s11606-021-06889-0. Epub 2021 May 24.
PMID: 34031853

Medicare beneficiary panel characteristics associated with high Part D biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug prescribing for older adults among rheumatologists.
Lee J, Chang CH, Yung R, Bynum JPW
Medicine (Baltimore). 2021 Apr 23;100(16):e25644. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000025644.
PMID: 33879745

Association of US Nurse and Physician Occupation With Risk of Suicide.
Davis MA, Cher BAY, Friese CR, Bynum JPW
JAMA Psychiatry. 2021 Apr 14; doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.0154. Epub 2021 Apr 14.
PMID: 33851982

Trends in antipsychotic prescribing among long-term care residents receiving hospice care.
Gerlach LB, Fashaw S, Strominger J, Ogarek J, Zullo AR, Daiello LA, Teno J, Shireman TI, Bynum JPW
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2021 Apr 9; doi: 10.1111/jgs.17172. Epub 2021 Apr 9.
PMID: 33837537

Changes in medication use among long-stay residents with dementia in Michigan during the pandemic.
Gerlach LB, Park PS, Shireman TI, Bynum JPW
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2021 Jul;69(7):1743-1745. doi: 10.1111/jgs.17161. Epub 2021 Apr 13.
PMID: 33834488

Resource Use Among Diabetes Patients Who Mainly Visit Primary Care Physicians Versus Medical Specialists: a Retrospective Cohort Study.
Nyweide DJ, Austin AM, Bynum JPW
J Gen Intern Med. 2021 Apr 1; doi: 10.1007/s11606-021-06710-y. Epub 2021 Apr 1.
PMID: 33796983

Prevalence of Central Nervous System-Active Polypharmacy Among Older Adults With Dementia in the US.
Maust DT, Strominger J, Kim HM, Langa KM, Bynum JPW, Chang CH, Kales HC, Zivin K, Solway E, Marcus SC
JAMA. 2021 Mar 9;325(10):952-961. doi: 10.1001/jama.2021.1195.
PMID: 33687462

Prevalence of psychotropic and opioid prescribing among hospice beneficiaries in the United States, 2014-2016.
Gerlach LB, Kales HC, Kim HM, Zhang L, Strominger J, Covinsky K, Teno J, Bynum JPW, Maust DT
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2021 Jun;69(6):1479-1489. doi: 10.1111/jgs.17085. Epub 2021 Mar 8.
PMID: 33683703

View more publications on PubMed