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Ruth W. Craig, PhD

Title(s):
Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Department(s):
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Education:
Pomona College, BA 1974
Boston University, MA 1980
SUNY - Buffalo, PHD 1984

Programs:
Immunology Program
Norris Cotton Cancer Center
Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program
Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine

Websites:
http://dms.dartmouth.edu/pharm-tox
https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=938
https://magazine.pomona.edu/2019/spring-summer/the-face-of-a-pandemic/

Contact Information:

HB 7650
Geisel School of Medicine
Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Hanover NH 03755

Phone: 603-727-6888
Fax: 603-650-1188
Email: ruth.craig@dartmouth.edu


Professional Interests:

• Causes of human mortality as they have evolved over the last several centuries.
• History of Families from the New England/Quebec/Nova Scotia area.


Rotations and Thesis Projects:

• Investigating why the fall wave of the 1918 flu, as opposed to the spring wave, killed unusual numbers of healthy, young adults.
• GIS mapping of the 1916 polio epidemic that started in Brooklyn, New York.
• Causes of death of residents of Hanover, New Hampshire in the 1800s.

Courses Taught:

Endocrinology Sections of Medical Pharmacology

Biography:

Dr. Ruth Craig received her B.S. in Zoology from Pomona College. She completed M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Pharmacology at, respectively, Boston University Medical School and the State University of New York. After postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School, she moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and then Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. In 2016, she earned the credential of Certified Genealogist® from the Board for Certification of Genealogists. She is currently the editor of the New Hampshire Genealogical Record.

Mentoring Information:

Mentoring Dartmouth undergraduates.


Selected Publications:

 

  • R Craig, Why Did the 1918 Flu Kill So Many Otherwise Healthy Young Adults? Smithsonianmag (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-did-1918-flu-kill-so-many-otherwise-healthy-young-adults-180967178/#k6wFzFTKWBGS3f08.01), October 2018.

  • R Craig, Brick Walls: Confusion in Names. Avotaynu 35 (Spring 2019): 60.

  • JA Preston, MA Bewley, HM Marriott, A McGarry Houghton, M Mohasin, J Jubrail, L Morris, YL Stephenson, S Cross, DR Greaves, RW Craig, N van Rooijen, CD Bingle, RC Read, TJ Mitchell, MKB Whyte, SD Shapiro, DH Dockrell, Alveolar Macrophage Apoptosis-associated Bacterial Killing Helps Prevent Murine Pneumonia. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 200 (July 2019): 84–97.

  • R Craig, Book Review of: Scott Andrew Bartley, Early Vermont Settlers to 1771: Volume 1: Southern Windsor County, National Genealogical Society Quarterly 106 (June 2018): 148-149.

  • R Craig, What Happened to the Jewish Infantryman? He Fought for Germany in World War I But Was He Able to Ship Out Before the Holocaust? Avotaynu 37 (Fall 2016): 49–52.

  • R Craig, Book Review of: Helen Schatvet Ullmann, ed., Western Massachusetts Families in 1790, vol. 4, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, 108 (June 2020), 148–149.

  • R Craig, Book Review of: Kyle Hurst, Ancestors and Descendants of Charles Le Caron and Victoire Sprague, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, 108 (Dec. 2020), 300–301.

  • R Craig, Context: Divorce, New Hampshire Genealogical Record, 33 (Spring 2021), 55–57.

  • A Ledoux, I Grallert, N Ratcliffe, and R Craig, An Epidemic in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1797, New Hampshire Genealogical Record, 32 (Fall 2020), 37–39.