C-CMC at Geisel

Required courses

Psychology of Illness, Patients, and Providers (Year One)
The Psychology of Illness, Patients, and Providers is a required unit for first-year Geisel students, within the "On Doctoring" course. Meeting 8 times during the academic year in both large and small groups, it assists students in exploring the burden of, and responses to, illness—from the perspectives of patients, their families, their friends and communities, physicians, and a wide variety of healthcare providers.

Psychology of Illness, Patients, and Providers (Year Two)
Formerly called "Connecting Hearts & Minds Rounds", these sessions occur seven times throughout the Year Two courses in the Scientific Basis of Medicine (SBM). Each session features facilitated discussion based on the narratives of a patient and a panel of the patient's care team members and family. Case topics are keyed to the current areas of study in SBM.

Reflection sessions during required clerkships: processing challenges, rewards, and dilemmas in clinical medicine
Each of the required clinical clerkships at Geisel has a unique way to allow students to explore various issues with peers and experts.

"Health and Values" curriculum at Geisel
As of March, 2016, the Medical Education Committee at Geisel decided to institute measures to ensure that issues related to health care ethics, the medical humanities, cultural awareness, human psychology, health equity, resilience education, and other related interdisciplinary areas would be incorporated into the four-year Geisel curriculum and culture.

The goal of this strategy is to ensure that all student-physicians graduating from the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. recognize and address common ethical issues in clinical care;
  2. understand the cultural and social context in which they will be practicing medicine;
  3. contribute to reducing health disparities experienced by the population;
  4. be attentive and open to varied perspectives and experiences of patients so as to exhibit compassion for patients, colleagues and themselves;
  5. think critically and communicate effectively, in order to guide the work of inter-professional teams toward delivering ethically grounded health care for each individual patient and the different communities they will serve; and
  6. practice reflection and self-care in order to maintain personal resilience over the span of their professional lifetimes.

Electives

The Healer's Art
Designed in 1991 by Rachel Naomi Remen, MD, the course offers a safe learning environment for a personal in-depth exploration of the time-honored values of service, healing relationship, reverence for life and compassionate care.

Rodis Fellowship in Compassionate Care
These Fellowships have a duration of one academic year. Fellows apply to create and execute a project that will advance knowledge about learning or delivering compassionate medical care. Overall guidance for the Fellowship is provided by a steering committee comprised of Geisel faculty members; Fellows are individually mentored by a faculty member.

Honors and awards

The Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award (presented by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation)
Each year, Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Awards are presented to a graduating student and faculty member at 96 of the nation's medical schools. This award is given to those who best demonstrate the Foundation's ideals of outstanding compassion in the delivery of care; respect for patients, their families, and healthcare colleagues; and clinical excellence. Thomas P. Almy Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society In 2002, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation (APGF) established the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) as a signature program to recognize medical students, residents, and faculty who practice patient-centered care by modeling the qualities of integrity, excellence, compassion, altruism, respect and empathy. Geisel has participated in this program since 2005; the late Thomas P. Almy, MD, was a distinguished physician, and Chair of the Department of Medicine from 1968-1985.

Thomas P. Almy Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society
In 2002, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation (APGF) established the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) as a signature program to recognize medical students, residents, and faculty who practice patient-centered care by modeling the qualities of integrity, excellence, compassion, altruism, respect and empathy. Geisel has participated in this program since 2005; the late Thomas P. Almy, MD, was a distinguished physician, and Chair of the Department of Medicine from 1968-1985.