In the News articles

New Hampshire Biologist Reacts to Gene-Editing Discovery – New Hampshire Union Leader

Read article – Quotes Bryan Luikart, assistant professor of molecular and systems biology, about a new study that reveals that scientists have successfully corrected a dangerous mutation in genes in human embryos, fixing a mutation that causes a common heart condition that can lead to sudden death later in life. “It is pretty amazing. It is a super-exciting time to be a scientist right now,” says Luikart, who was not involved in the study.

Five Things to Know About Gastroenteritis – CNN

Read article – Cites comments by Corey Siegel, associate professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article that shares five facts about gastroenteritis. Siegel, a gastroenterologist, notes that the elderly are at especially high risk of getting dehydrated when they have gastroenteritis, and that dehydration can lead to kidney problems.

Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair With Prescription Medication – Consumer Reports

Read article – Quotes Steven Woloshin, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article that examines America’s reliance on pharmaceuticals, and the role that marketing companies play in encouraging the consumption of pharmaceuticals. “Low T is a marketing term intended to sell testosterone as a kind of fountain of youth,” says Woloshin. For most men, he says, testosterone “declines naturally with age,” and research shows that taking drugs to compensate has “little or no benefit” and “some serious risks.”

Number of Mass. Fentanyl Deaths Alarms DEA – The Boston Globe

Read article – Quotes Lisa Marsch, director of the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health (CTBH) and professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, about how she and additional colleagues released a study in June that pointed to Lawrence, Mass., as a major gateway for the fentanyl ravaging New Hampshire. Marsch, who led the study, said the sudden shift from heroin to fentanyl has been startling. “That’s what people want now,” says Marsch. “They want this more potent product.

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