Articles by: Geisel Communications

Vaping and Using Nicotine Patches During Pregnancy Could Raise Risk of Crib Death, Rat Study Suggests – Newsweek

Read article – Features a study conducted by researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine that found that mothers who vape or wear nicotine patches during pregnancy increase their baby’s risk of crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome—the unexpected death of an apparently healthy child under the age of 12 months, typically during sleep. (Similar coverage in HealthDay News, U.S. News & World Report, The Sun, and Independent.ie.)

Mothers Who Vape or Wear Nicotine Patches During Pregnancy Increase Their Baby’s Risk of Cot Death – Daily Mail

Read article – Features a study conducted by researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine that found that mothers who vape or wear nicotine patches during pregnancy increase their baby’s risk of cot death, or sudden infant death syndrome—the unexpected death of an apparently healthy child under the age of 12 months, typically during sleep. (Similar coverage in PerthNow, Montreal Gazette, and The Irish Times.)

Advance DNA Screening With Clear Vision, Care – The Daily Item

Read article – Quotes H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about Geisinger Health System’s new DNA screening program for patients. The article quotes comments by Welch previously published by NPR, where he acknowledges that some mutations may have actionable treatments, but others may not. “What are we really going to do differently for these patients?” asks Welch. “We should all be concerned about heart disease. We should all exercise; we should eat real food.”

Should You Record Your Visits to the Doctor? – Next Avenue

Read article – Quotes Timothy Lahey, associate professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology, and of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an article about how some patients are using smartphones to record their office visits and other interactions with their doctors. Lahey weighs in on what doctors think of being taped. “It’s not yet part of most doctors’ routine practice,” says Lahey. “So it’s new and it makes some doctors go, ‘Hmm.'”

Dartmouth + Innovation + Cancer

Dartmouth + Innovation + Cancer

Many discoveries now revolutionizing the prevention and treatment of cancer can be traced back to Dartmouth—including immunotherapies for solid tumors, the integration of palliative care with cancer care, and the identification of cancer risks from environmental toxins and behaviors.

The Pipeline to Primary Care Is Drying Up – The Hill

Read article – An opinion piece by Roshini Pinto-Powell, associate professor of medicine and of medical education, in which she discusses the current trend of medical students choosing not to go into primary care. “For PCPs at the bottom of the compensation list, resurrecting and sustaining the notion of medicine as a calling is necessary. More than simply increasing monetary compensation, the healthcare system, our specialist colleagues, and patients need to show by their words and actions that primary care is a valued service,” says Pinto-Powell. (Pinto-Powell is participating in this year’s Dartmouth Public Voices project.)

The Alcohol Industry Doesn’t Want Us to Drink Like Adults – The Outline

Read article – Quotes James Sargent, the Scott M. and Lisa G. Stuart Professor of Pediatric Oncology and professor of pediatrics, biomedical data science, and community and family medicine, in an article about how the alcohol industry spends hundreds of millions of dollars a year to convince us that drinking alcohol and living a good, meaningful life are inextricably intertwined. “How we view drinking as a culture is not accidental,” says Sargent. “It’s been carefully scripted for us by the alcohol industry, in ads we’ve seen since we were little kids.”