Training Opportunities

A. ORIENTATION

The ARC offers a variety of training materials and programs for both our staff and the research community. As of March 2004, all new Dartmouth employees and students working with research animals will need to attend an ACUP orientation and an animal facility tour prior to gaining access to the Borwell, Vail, or Moore Facility. The Orientation presentation will focus more on Federal Regulations and policies. The tour will enable new users to physically see the where all of the PPE and equipment is stored, how to request items, and proper procedures when using the hood and working with the animals. It will also allow them to see the facility in action and meet some of the animal technicians.

Access to the facilities is dependent upon attendance at this orientation. For a schedule of upcoming Orientations please click here. Pre-registration is required for all tours.

B. LABORATORY CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM

The Office for Research Integrity (of the DHHS) promotes integrity in biomedical and behavioral research supported by the Public Health Service (PHS) at about 4,000 institutions worldwide. One way to support this integrity is to offer annual continuing education (CE) to our research community. The ARC and the IACUC have both sponsored these sessions. Recent topics have covered topics ranging from the Rodent Automated Watering System to Understanding Pain in Rats. As this is a continually evolving topic, if there is a subject that your laboratory would like more information on, please contact Dr. Brian Ermeling, to discuss the possibilities of a presentation to your lab.

C. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE, ANESTHESIA & ANALGESIA, SPECIES SPECIFIC HANDLING

The ARC veterinary staff offers more specialized training in surgical technique, anesthesia & analgesia, species specific handling and ethics. These are arranged through individual departments, or directly with the ARC through Eric Dufour.

D. SPECIFIC TRAINING IN DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

There are many areas of Laboratory Animal Medicine that need explanation and training. We currently have training available for the use of the Quarantine area on a case-by- case basis. Before access to these areas can be granted, personnel must meet with either the Operations Manager or Lab Animal Technologist for training in the use of proper PPE and traffic flow patterns, as well as work areas available to researchers and their staff. Please email the ARC Office for further information and to arrange training.

We also have Post Procedural Care Guidelines available both on-line and in hardcopy available in the ARC office. If you would like a hardcopy of these guidelines please contact the IACUC Coordinator.

E. ALAT CERTIFICATION CLASSES

The American Association for the Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS) offers graduated certification levels to laboratory animal care technicians. The first level is the Assistant Laboratory Animal Technician (ALAT). The ARC veterinary staff is currently offering a ALAT class for those that qualify and would like to participate. These classes are scheduled through the ARC office, if you would like more information please contact the ARC Office.

F. LIBRARY AND VIDEO REFERENCE AVAILABLE

The ARC has an extensive library and video resources available for use by the Dartmouth community. We are currently preparing a complete catalog of this resources which will be online.

The AWIC site has a wonderful selection of videos available for loan.


Borwell Mouse Barrier 2005 (pdf)

Basic Mouse Breeding And Weaning Procedures


Medipoint Inc. Goldenrod Animal Lancet

A new technique for blood sampling of mice has recently been approved for use. The new method offers several advantages over techniques currently used at Dartmouth; no anesthesia, surgical procedures or prolonged restraint is required and it is simple to do repetitive bleeds. Veins draining the eye and submandibular area meet at the rear of the cheek pouch providing a convenient and consistent source of blood. A simple puncture using a sterile lancet at the junction of the facial, submandibular veins allows for the collection of a few drops up to .5 ml from a mouse quickly and easily with minimal stress to the animal.

To receive the necessary training for this technique, please contact:

Eric Dufour, MLT,LAT
eric.dufour@dartmouth.edu
(603)650-7528

Video of this technique (wmv) 3.7mb